Hubble images shed new light on planetary nebulae

Researchers from Green Bank Observatory and the Rochester Institute of Technology shed new light on nebula formation process

On top is an image of the Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2019 and released in 2020. Further analysis by researchers produced the RGB image on the bottom, which shows extinction due to dust, as inferred from the relative strength of two hydrogen emission lines, as red; emission from nitrogen, relative to hydrogen, as green; and emission from iron as blue. Credit: STScI, APOD/J. Schmidt; J. Kastner (RIT) et al.

Images of two iconic planetary nebulae taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are revealing new information about how they develop their dramatic features. Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Green Bank Observatory presented new findings about the Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) and the Jewel Bug Nebula (NGC 7027) at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society on Friday, January 15th.

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Milky Way’s Defensive Halo Blocks Incoming Gas Cloud

Composite image created by Kat Barger, with GBT data represented in orange, using the Milky Way Panorama in the background (background image credit ESO/S. Brunier.)

How are galaxies able to keep forming stars and planets? Astronomers from Texas Christian University are using the Green Bank Telescope to reveal more about this process, studying high-velocity clouds that are being pulled into our Milky Way galaxy by its gravitational pull.

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Science Newsletter AAS 237 Edition

The Green Bank Observatory at AAS 237

For the January 2021 meeting there are approximately 47 presentations, sessions, iPosters, and press conferences featuring Green Bank Telescope data, Green Bank Observatory staff, partner organizations, and REU summer students. This list is evolving as the full breadth of meeting items that mention the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and the Green Bank Observatory are brought to our attention. 

View a PDF of the list here.  We’re using the #AAS237 hashtag on our Twitter @GreenBankObserv to share all of our conference news and resources – be sure to follow along!

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Unraveling the mysteries of the cosmos: New telescope at Green Bank Observatory will improve localization of Fast Radio Bursts

West Virginia University recently announced that a $1.7 million National Science Foundation grant will be used to construct a new telescope at the Green Bank Observatory. This new instrument will be used in association with the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, or CHIME, telescope, which is located half a continent away in British Columbia. CHIME’s focus is studying Fast Radio Bursts, or FRBs. The new instrument at Green Bank will work with the existing CHIME telescope to triangulate the locations of FRBs.

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