Search Results for ""

More than Meets the Eye: Complete Imaging of Cluster Collision

Image credit: PI Nobuhiro Okabe; Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan/HSC-SSP collaboration; National Science Foundation/Green Bank Observatory/Green Bank Telescope; European Space Agency/XMM-Newton/XXL survey consortium.

An international team of astronomers using the National Science Foundation’s Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in Green Bank, West Virginia, has captured a snapshot of a giant cosmic collision. This composite image was created using radio, X-ray, and optical data collected with the MUSTANG-2 receiver on the GBT, the European Science Agency’s (ESA) XMM-Newton Satellite, and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan’s (NAOJ) Subaru Telescope in Hawaii.

(more…)

2021A Science Program

Green Bank Observatory 2021A Science Program

A total of 80 proposals requesting NSF funded “open skies” time were submitted to the Green Bank Observatory’s Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) for the August 3, 2020 semester 21A deadline. The table below summarizes the approved observing programs. Listed are the PI name, proposal ID, proposal title, maximum hours approved and proposal type (Regular, Triggered, Large or External). Proposals from previous semesters that were awarded time in the 21A semester are included. The table also includes HSA and GMVA proposals that were awarded time on the GBT as a VLBI station as well as proposal accepted via external agreements with CHANDRA, Hubble Space Telescope, FERMI and Swift.

(more…)

2021A Results

A total of 80 proposals requesting NSF funded “open skies” time were submitted to the Green Bank Observatory’s Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) for semester 21A. Proposals are reviewed on a competitive basis with a panel review system (see Proposal Review System). Below are the statistics by proposal count and hours. The oversubscription is the ratio of the number of submitted proposals to the number of approved proposals. The pressure is the ratio of the requested time to the available time in hours. Here we only include proposals submitted for the 21A semester that have been reviewed by the Green Bank Observatory Telescope Allocation Committee (TAC).

A description of the 21A proposals accepted can be found at 2021A Science Program

Total Proposals82
Approved31
Filler11
Rejected36
Hold2
Withdrawn0
Over-subscription 2.6
Table 1
Requested Time5048 hours
Available Time2664.5 hours
Approved1383.75 hours
Filler1046 hours
Rejected2525.75 hours
Pressure1.9
Table 2

GBT Pressure Plots

Observations in high frequency bands require better weather conditions than observations in lower frequency bands. The GBT uses three weather categories: poor (for observations below 8 GHz), good (observations between 8-18 GHz and 26.5-50 GHz), and excellent (observation in the 18-26.5 GHz band and above 50 GHz). The first three figures below show the pressure plots for each these weather categories. The last figure includes all weather categories. The grey horizontal line shows the total available hours. The letters A, B, and C correspond to the priorities assigned by the TAC where A and B are approved time and C is filler time. Carryover is time allocated by a TAC from a previous semester that is being executed in the 21A semester.

Pressure below 8 GHz
Good pressure (observations between 8-18 GHz and 26.5-50 GHz)
Excellent pressure (observation in the 18-26.5 GHz band and above 50 GHz)
Total pressure for all weather categories

GBT Observation Preparation

Please use the GBT Dynamic Scheduling System (DSS) to enable observing sessions, select observers for your project, and enter your blackout dates. The DSS Home Page has additional information about the DSS. See GBT Observing for information about how to prepare for your observations.

Please note that the DSS uses the average Right Ascension (RA) and Declination (Dec) of all sources within a session. The average RA and Dec will be used to determine when the session can be scheduled. You will need to carefully check the RA and Dec, along with the minimum and maximum session lengths, to make sure that these values are satisfactory and will allow all your sources to be observed before enabling the session.