News

01/29/2016: This town lives without cellphones, Wi-Fi: Meet Green Bank, West Virginia

Imagine making plans with your friends — by walking to their house to talk in person. That’s the norm at Green Bank, West Virginia, where its 143 residents can’t rely on their cellphones or tablets to connect with friends and loved ones because all wireless devices are forbidden. Located within a 13,000-square mile area known…

01/26/2016: Green Bank, the City of the No Signal Mobile, Wi-Fi, Radio and Television

Green Bank, in Pocahontas County in West Virginia, USA, is one of the quiet residential place on earth. Here there is absolutely no cell phone signal, no Wi-Fi signal, even here there is no radio and television waves that can be captured. But Green Bank instead of lagging behind in technology. Instead, this area is…

01/25/2016: Werner Herzog’s internet doc Lo and Behold is a must-see for anyone on social networks

A group of scientists at Carnegie Mellon believe that by the year 2050, robots designed to play soccer will surpass their professional human counterparts. This juicy nugget of techno-speculation materializes in the middle of Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World, a new documentary broadly about the internet from Werner Herzog. Sporty robot prototypes,…

01/06/2016: How residents of a tiny West Virginia community live without any kind of modern technology

In West Virginia, just 200 miles away from Washington, DC, you’ll find a community of roughly 8,000 people who live completely off the grid. In the 13,000-square-mile “National Radio Quiet Zone,” all cell phone, Wi-Fi, microwaves, and even some vacuum use are all banned by law. The restrictions were put in place because of the 11…

NPR: Enter the Quiet Zone

There are no physical signs you’ve entered the National Radio Quiet Zone, a 13,000-square-mile area that covers the eastern half of West Virginia. But the silence gives you a signal. Somewhere around the Virginia-West Virginia state line, the periodic buzzes and pings of our smartphones stopped. “Zero [service]. Searching,” said photographer John Poole, who traveled…